Halo: Nightfall exclusive image featuring Mike Colter as Agent Locke (via theomeganerd)
We are excited to announce that Mike Colter, best known for his role in CBS’s critically acclaimed drama “The Good Wife,” will star in Halo: Nightfall as Agent Jameson Locke. Halo: Nightfall is a live-action digital series that introduces Jameson Locke, a pivotal new character in the Halo universe, who plays a key role in Halo 5: Guardians. Taking place between the events of Halo 4 and Halo 5: Guardians, this is an origin story that will lend insight and understanding into the character he becomes in Halo 5: Guardians.Led by world class talent such as executive producer Ridley Scott, Scott Free TV President David Zucker, and director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan, Halo: Nightfall will take full advantage of Xbox One’s seamless blend of high-quality visuals and storytelling and rich interactivity, connecting the games and the series in innovative new ways.We’ll have more details to share at the SDCC panel on Thursday, July 24. Until then, check out the exclusive image above, and take a gander at these photos below of Mike Colter as Jameson Locke in Halo: Nightfall. Read the full Mike Colter Q & A on Variety

Halo: Nightfall exclusive image featuring Mike Colter as Agent Locke (via theomeganerd)
We are excited to announce that Mike Colter, best known for his role in CBS’s critically acclaimed drama “The Good Wife,” will star in Halo: Nightfall as Agent Jameson Locke. Halo: Nightfall is a live-action digital series that introduces Jameson Locke, a pivotal new character in the Halo universe, who plays a key role in Halo 5: Guardians. Taking place between the events of Halo 4 and Halo 5: Guardians, this is an origin story that will lend insight and understanding into the character he becomes in Halo 5: Guardians.Led by world class talent such as executive producer Ridley Scott, Scott Free TV President David Zucker, and director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan, Halo: Nightfall will take full advantage of Xbox One’s seamless blend of high-quality visuals and storytelling and rich interactivity, connecting the games and the series in innovative new ways.We’ll have more details to share at the SDCC panel on Thursday, July 24. Until then, check out the exclusive image above, and take a gander at these photos below of Mike Colter as Jameson Locke in Halo: Nightfall. Read the full Mike Colter Q & A on Variety

Halo: Nightfall exclusive image featuring Mike Colter as Agent Locke (via theomeganerd)
We are excited to announce that Mike Colter, best known for his role in CBS’s critically acclaimed drama “The Good Wife,” will star in Halo: Nightfall as Agent Jameson Locke. Halo: Nightfall is a live-action digital series that introduces Jameson Locke, a pivotal new character in the Halo universe, who plays a key role in Halo 5: Guardians. Taking place between the events of Halo 4 and Halo 5: Guardians, this is an origin story that will lend insight and understanding into the character he becomes in Halo 5: Guardians.Led by world class talent such as executive producer Ridley Scott, Scott Free TV President David Zucker, and director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan, Halo: Nightfall will take full advantage of Xbox One’s seamless blend of high-quality visuals and storytelling and rich interactivity, connecting the games and the series in innovative new ways.We’ll have more details to share at the SDCC panel on Thursday, July 24. Until then, check out the exclusive image above, and take a gander at these photos below of Mike Colter as Jameson Locke in Halo: Nightfall. Read the full Mike Colter Q & A on Variety

Halo: Nightfall exclusive image featuring Mike Colter as Agent Locke (via theomeganerd)


We are excited to announce that Mike Colter, best known for his role in CBS’s critically acclaimed drama “The Good Wife,” will star in Halo: Nightfall as Agent Jameson Locke. 

Halo: Nightfall is a live-action digital series that introduces Jameson Locke, a pivotal new character in the Halo universe, who plays a key role in Halo 5: Guardians. Taking place between the events of Halo 4 and Halo 5: Guardians, this is an origin story that will lend insight and understanding into the character he becomes in Halo 5: Guardians.

Led by world class talent such as executive producer Ridley Scott, Scott Free TV President David Zucker, and director Sergio Mimica-Gezzan, Halo: Nightfall will take full advantage of Xbox One’s seamless blend of high-quality visuals and storytelling and rich interactivity, connecting the games and the series in innovative new ways.

We’ll have more details to share at the SDCC panel on Thursday, July 24. Until then, check out the exclusive image above, and take a gander at these photos below of Mike Colter as Jameson Locke in Halo: Nightfall. 

Read the full Mike Colter Q & A on Variety

(Source: blogs.halowaypoint.com)

Misleading on Marriage: how gay marriage opponents twist history to suit their agenda 
"Let me take you on a millennia-long walk down the aisle. The modern notion of marriage is connected with the historical, traditional model that those opposed to marriage equality like to cite, but it’s not nearly as clean a connection as parties on either side of the same-sex marriage divide would like to claim. It is in fact, varied, changeable, and chaotic. 
For the Romans in the early Christian era, marriage was a civil matter, based either on two free adults living together or a formal contract regarding property and inheritance. Cicero in De Oratore 3.133 provides a list of business matters in which one might consult a professional and includes purchasing a farm, best practices for agricultural success, and selecting a husband for a daughter.
For Jews, marriage was a matter of contracts and agreements between parents, and the sign of adult independence. Historically, Jewish law sanctioned fairly simple divorce and both polygyny and concubines to the extent that King Solomon is said to have 300 wives of royal birth, and 700 concubines (1 Kings 11:3). In the case of Solomon, marrying the daughters of neighboring kings was good politics, and polygyny made that possible in abundance.
Because marriage cemented social and business connections between families, it wasn’t uncommon for daughters to be married off with an eye to enhancing family connections (or making peace) without their consent, even when the participants were Christian. Since local customs often defined marriage in terms of the couple living together and engaging in sex, bridal abduction, wherein the bride to be was simply kidnapped, with or without her consent, and forcibly married, was fairly common.
For most of the middle ages, marriage was a secular, civil issue, and did not involve the church, or clergy. It wasn’t until Gratian’s Decretum (ca. 1140) that canon law required both participants to verbally consent to a marriage or it would not be recognized by the church…”
Keep reading at Boing Boing

Misleading on Marriage: how gay marriage opponents twist history to suit their agenda 

"Let me take you on a millennia-long walk down the aisle. The modern notion of marriage is connected with the historical, traditional model that those opposed to marriage equality like to cite, but it’s not nearly as clean a connection as parties on either side of the same-sex marriage divide would like to claim. It is in fact, varied, changeable, and chaotic.

For the Romans in the early Christian era, marriage was a civil matter, based either on two free adults living together or a formal contract regarding property and inheritance. Cicero in De Oratore 3.133 provides a list of business matters in which one might consult a professional and includes purchasing a farm, best practices for agricultural success, and selecting a husband for a daughter.

For Jews, marriage was a matter of contracts and agreements between parents, and the sign of adult independence. Historically, Jewish law sanctioned fairly simple divorce and both polygyny and concubines to the extent that King Solomon is said to have 300 wives of royal birth, and 700 concubines (1 Kings 11:3). In the case of Solomon, marrying the daughters of neighboring kings was good politics, and polygyny made that possible in abundance.

Because marriage cemented social and business connections between families, it wasn’t uncommon for daughters to be married off with an eye to enhancing family connections (or making peace) without their consent, even when the participants were Christian. Since local customs often defined marriage in terms of the couple living together and engaging in sex, bridal abduction, wherein the bride to be was simply kidnapped, with or without her consent, and forcibly married, was fairly common.

For most of the middle ages, marriage was a secular, civil issue, and did not involve the church, or clergy. It wasn’t until Gratian’s Decretum (ca. 1140) that canon law required both participants to verbally consent to a marriage or it would not be recognized by the church…”

Keep reading at Boing Boing