Beard Science (via Sci-ence)
You can check out the studies: 
“Microbiological Laboratory Hazard of Bearded Men by Manuel S. Barbeito, Charles T. Mathews, and Larry A. Taylor. This paper, while almost half a century old, is well worth the read for the images alone.
Beards Augment Perceptions of Men’s Age, Social Status, and Aggressiveness, but Not Attractiveness by Barnaby J. Dixson and Paul L. Vasey. This article jumped out at me not for the subject matter, but for it’s co-author, Paul Vasey. He’s a behavioral neuroscientist who along with studying beards, conducted some fascinating research in the Samoas. In Samoan culture, there are three genders: male, female, and a group called Fa’afafine (“In the manner of a woman”). They are boys who are recognized at an early age as being different and brought up as girls with a specific role in assisting their siblings in child rearing.
The Role of Facial Hair in Women’s Perceptions of Men’s Attractiveness, Health, Masculinity and Parenting Abilities by Barnaby J. Dixson and Robert C. Brooks. Who comes up with these titles? 
Dosimetric Investigation of the Solar Erythemal UV Radiation Protection Provided by Beards and Moustaches by A.V. Parisi, D. J. Turnbull, N. Downs, and D. Smith. The conclusion is simple. Beards block UV light from hitting your face. The researchers placed mannequin heads out in the hot Australian sun and measured their UV exposure. For the sake of your skin, I recommend growing a beard immediately.
If you hate beards and would rather get skin cancer, know that the most exposed area was found to be the upper lip, so you could always just get a math teacher mustache or something.”
Beard Science (via Sci-ence)
You can check out the studies: 
“Microbiological Laboratory Hazard of Bearded Men by Manuel S. Barbeito, Charles T. Mathews, and Larry A. Taylor. This paper, while almost half a century old, is well worth the read for the images alone.
Beards Augment Perceptions of Men’s Age, Social Status, and Aggressiveness, but Not Attractiveness by Barnaby J. Dixson and Paul L. Vasey. This article jumped out at me not for the subject matter, but for it’s co-author, Paul Vasey. He’s a behavioral neuroscientist who along with studying beards, conducted some fascinating research in the Samoas. In Samoan culture, there are three genders: male, female, and a group called Fa’afafine (“In the manner of a woman”). They are boys who are recognized at an early age as being different and brought up as girls with a specific role in assisting their siblings in child rearing.
The Role of Facial Hair in Women’s Perceptions of Men’s Attractiveness, Health, Masculinity and Parenting Abilities by Barnaby J. Dixson and Robert C. Brooks. Who comes up with these titles? 
Dosimetric Investigation of the Solar Erythemal UV Radiation Protection Provided by Beards and Moustaches by A.V. Parisi, D. J. Turnbull, N. Downs, and D. Smith. The conclusion is simple. Beards block UV light from hitting your face. The researchers placed mannequin heads out in the hot Australian sun and measured their UV exposure. For the sake of your skin, I recommend growing a beard immediately.
If you hate beards and would rather get skin cancer, know that the most exposed area was found to be the upper lip, so you could always just get a math teacher mustache or something.”
Beard Science (via Sci-ence)
You can check out the studies: 
“Microbiological Laboratory Hazard of Bearded Men by Manuel S. Barbeito, Charles T. Mathews, and Larry A. Taylor. This paper, while almost half a century old, is well worth the read for the images alone.
Beards Augment Perceptions of Men’s Age, Social Status, and Aggressiveness, but Not Attractiveness by Barnaby J. Dixson and Paul L. Vasey. This article jumped out at me not for the subject matter, but for it’s co-author, Paul Vasey. He’s a behavioral neuroscientist who along with studying beards, conducted some fascinating research in the Samoas. In Samoan culture, there are three genders: male, female, and a group called Fa’afafine (“In the manner of a woman”). They are boys who are recognized at an early age as being different and brought up as girls with a specific role in assisting their siblings in child rearing.
The Role of Facial Hair in Women’s Perceptions of Men’s Attractiveness, Health, Masculinity and Parenting Abilities by Barnaby J. Dixson and Robert C. Brooks. Who comes up with these titles? 
Dosimetric Investigation of the Solar Erythemal UV Radiation Protection Provided by Beards and Moustaches by A.V. Parisi, D. J. Turnbull, N. Downs, and D. Smith. The conclusion is simple. Beards block UV light from hitting your face. The researchers placed mannequin heads out in the hot Australian sun and measured their UV exposure. For the sake of your skin, I recommend growing a beard immediately.
If you hate beards and would rather get skin cancer, know that the most exposed area was found to be the upper lip, so you could always just get a math teacher mustache or something.”
Beard Science (via Sci-ence)
You can check out the studies: 
“Microbiological Laboratory Hazard of Bearded Men by Manuel S. Barbeito, Charles T. Mathews, and Larry A. Taylor. This paper, while almost half a century old, is well worth the read for the images alone.
Beards Augment Perceptions of Men’s Age, Social Status, and Aggressiveness, but Not Attractiveness by Barnaby J. Dixson and Paul L. Vasey. This article jumped out at me not for the subject matter, but for it’s co-author, Paul Vasey. He’s a behavioral neuroscientist who along with studying beards, conducted some fascinating research in the Samoas. In Samoan culture, there are three genders: male, female, and a group called Fa’afafine (“In the manner of a woman”). They are boys who are recognized at an early age as being different and brought up as girls with a specific role in assisting their siblings in child rearing.
The Role of Facial Hair in Women’s Perceptions of Men’s Attractiveness, Health, Masculinity and Parenting Abilities by Barnaby J. Dixson and Robert C. Brooks. Who comes up with these titles? 
Dosimetric Investigation of the Solar Erythemal UV Radiation Protection Provided by Beards and Moustaches by A.V. Parisi, D. J. Turnbull, N. Downs, and D. Smith. The conclusion is simple. Beards block UV light from hitting your face. The researchers placed mannequin heads out in the hot Australian sun and measured their UV exposure. For the sake of your skin, I recommend growing a beard immediately.
If you hate beards and would rather get skin cancer, know that the most exposed area was found to be the upper lip, so you could always just get a math teacher mustache or something.”
Beard Science (via Sci-ence)
You can check out the studies: 
“Microbiological Laboratory Hazard of Bearded Men by Manuel S. Barbeito, Charles T. Mathews, and Larry A. Taylor. This paper, while almost half a century old, is well worth the read for the images alone.
Beards Augment Perceptions of Men’s Age, Social Status, and Aggressiveness, but Not Attractiveness by Barnaby J. Dixson and Paul L. Vasey. This article jumped out at me not for the subject matter, but for it’s co-author, Paul Vasey. He’s a behavioral neuroscientist who along with studying beards, conducted some fascinating research in the Samoas. In Samoan culture, there are three genders: male, female, and a group called Fa’afafine (“In the manner of a woman”). They are boys who are recognized at an early age as being different and brought up as girls with a specific role in assisting their siblings in child rearing.
The Role of Facial Hair in Women’s Perceptions of Men’s Attractiveness, Health, Masculinity and Parenting Abilities by Barnaby J. Dixson and Robert C. Brooks. Who comes up with these titles? 
Dosimetric Investigation of the Solar Erythemal UV Radiation Protection Provided by Beards and Moustaches by A.V. Parisi, D. J. Turnbull, N. Downs, and D. Smith. The conclusion is simple. Beards block UV light from hitting your face. The researchers placed mannequin heads out in the hot Australian sun and measured their UV exposure. For the sake of your skin, I recommend growing a beard immediately.
If you hate beards and would rather get skin cancer, know that the most exposed area was found to be the upper lip, so you could always just get a math teacher mustache or something.”
Beard Science (via Sci-ence)
You can check out the studies: 
“Microbiological Laboratory Hazard of Bearded Men by Manuel S. Barbeito, Charles T. Mathews, and Larry A. Taylor. This paper, while almost half a century old, is well worth the read for the images alone.
Beards Augment Perceptions of Men’s Age, Social Status, and Aggressiveness, but Not Attractiveness by Barnaby J. Dixson and Paul L. Vasey. This article jumped out at me not for the subject matter, but for it’s co-author, Paul Vasey. He’s a behavioral neuroscientist who along with studying beards, conducted some fascinating research in the Samoas. In Samoan culture, there are three genders: male, female, and a group called Fa’afafine (“In the manner of a woman”). They are boys who are recognized at an early age as being different and brought up as girls with a specific role in assisting their siblings in child rearing.
The Role of Facial Hair in Women’s Perceptions of Men’s Attractiveness, Health, Masculinity and Parenting Abilities by Barnaby J. Dixson and Robert C. Brooks. Who comes up with these titles? 
Dosimetric Investigation of the Solar Erythemal UV Radiation Protection Provided by Beards and Moustaches by A.V. Parisi, D. J. Turnbull, N. Downs, and D. Smith. The conclusion is simple. Beards block UV light from hitting your face. The researchers placed mannequin heads out in the hot Australian sun and measured their UV exposure. For the sake of your skin, I recommend growing a beard immediately.
If you hate beards and would rather get skin cancer, know that the most exposed area was found to be the upper lip, so you could always just get a math teacher mustache or something.”

Beard Science (via Sci-ence)

You can check out the studies: 

Microbiological Laboratory Hazard of Bearded Men by Manuel S. Barbeito, Charles T. Mathews, and Larry A. Taylor. This paper, while almost half a century old, is well worth the read for the images alone.

Beards Augment Perceptions of Men’s Age, Social Status, and Aggressiveness, but Not Attractiveness by Barnaby J. Dixson and Paul L. Vasey. This article jumped out at me not for the subject matter, but for it’s co-author, Paul Vasey. He’s a behavioral neuroscientist who along with studying beards, conducted some fascinating research in the Samoas. In Samoan culture, there are three genders: male, female, and a group called Fa’afafine (“In the manner of a woman”). They are boys who are recognized at an early age as being different and brought up as girls with a specific role in assisting their siblings in child rearing.

The Role of Facial Hair in Women’s Perceptions of Men’s Attractiveness, Health, Masculinity and Parenting Abilities by Barnaby J. Dixson and Robert C. Brooks. Who comes up with these titles? 

Dosimetric Investigation of the Solar Erythemal UV Radiation Protection Provided by Beards and Moustaches by A.V. Parisi, D. J. Turnbull, N. Downs, and D. Smith. The conclusion is simple. Beards block UV light from hitting your face. The researchers placed mannequin heads out in the hot Australian sun and measured their UV exposure. For the sake of your skin, I recommend growing a beard immediately.

If you hate beards and would rather get skin cancer, know that the most exposed area was found to be the upper lip, so you could always just get a math teacher mustache or something.”

  1. soyunmito reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  2. theonetruescotsman reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  3. lentoydoloroso reblogged this from lachorradadeldia
  4. saltandhype reblogged this from lordoflemongrab
  5. mtface reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  6. annehathawill reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  7. deepthought88 reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  8. totally-not-the-iblis-trigger reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  9. secrets-inc reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  10. thepandanotes reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  11. lachorradadeldia reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  12. failedsurvivalcheck reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  13. reaverrevolver reblogged this from bluedogeyes
  14. bluedogeyes posted this