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Assassins Creed III: Info (via GamingBolt)
The new Assassin is the son of a Native American woman and a British soldier. He calls himself Connor, but his birth name is Ratohnhaké:ton. Born into the Mohawk, he eventually crosses paths with the Assassins in his search for righteousness.
The cinematic presentations will extend beyond combat into a complex way of storytelling. The game will have actually have the Mohawk language (Iroquois) in some scenes. Mohawk was one of the languages of the native Americans.
There will be brand new environments and all-new ways to exploit them to your advantage, according to the creative director Alex Hutchinson.


Connor is quiet and stoic, letting actions speak for himself rather than conversing with others. In contrast to Ezio, Connor is a freedom fighter who acts in the name of justice rather than on personal revenge.
Settings will include Boston, New York and a large countryside. The countryside will be the setting of about 1/3 of the game, and will be the location of many events during the game. The countryside will be about 1.5 times as big as Rome in Brotherhood.
The protagonist will fight on the American side, with primary allies being George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and Charles Lee. However, this does not mean that the Americans are the good guys and the British are the bad guys. Templars are everywhere.

Fighting and stealth will be completely re-innovated, with Connor being compared to a “predator”. The player will be able to climb trees and other natural elements, and dual-wielding weapons such as a dagger and a tomahawk is now also an option.
Animals will be present in the woods, like deer and bears. The player will be able to kill them and pelt their skins, to sell them later with the reformed economic system of the game.

Assassins Creed III: Info (via GamingBolt)

The new Assassin is the son of a Native American woman and a British soldier. He calls himself Connor, but his birth name is Ratohnhaké:ton. Born into the Mohawk, he eventually crosses paths with the Assassins in his search for righteousness.

The cinematic presentations will extend beyond combat into a complex way of storytelling. The game will have actually have the Mohawk language (Iroquois) in some scenes. Mohawk was one of the languages of the native Americans.

There will be brand new environments and all-new ways to exploit them to your advantage, according to the creative director Alex Hutchinson.

Connor is quiet and stoic, letting actions speak for himself rather than conversing with others. In contrast to Ezio, Connor is a freedom fighter who acts in the name of justice rather than on personal revenge.

Settings will include Boston, New York and a large countryside. The countryside will be the setting of about 1/3 of the game, and will be the location of many events during the game. The countryside will be about 1.5 times as big as Rome in Brotherhood.

The protagonist will fight on the American side, with primary allies being George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and Charles Lee. However, this does not mean that the Americans are the good guys and the British are the bad guys. Templars are everywhere.

Fighting and stealth will be completely re-innovated, with Connor being compared to a “predator”. The player will be able to climb trees and other natural elements, and dual-wielding weapons such as a dagger and a tomahawk is now also an option.

Animals will be present in the woods, like deer and bears. The player will be able to kill them and pelt their skins, to sell them later with the reformed economic system of the game.



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Why a Colonial Assassin’s Creed Makes Complete Sense (and Sounds Awesome)
Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed games may play loose with the facts, but in the more tangible history of a time period, they excel. What I mean by that is the politics, the attitudes, the society, even the fashion. It’ll be interesting seeing them apply the same focus to such a revered time in American history, and hopefully show that it wasn’t all as heroic as most movies and popular accounts would have you believe.
The choice of a Native American protagonist, as it appears has been made, would only aid this. Rather than having you play as a colonial, or a loyalist, being one of the indigenous population gives them the opportunity to propel the story from outside the partisan restrictions of the reds vs the blues.

People are already complaining that Colonial America lacked the large urban sprawls present in previous games. To that I say…those cities weren’t exactly to scale. You can’t run across Constantinople in a day. I also say, Colonial America had plenty of large urban centres. New York at the time was home to just under 50,000 people, while there were around 25,000 living in Philadelphia. Not exactly Rome, I grant you that, but big enough (if recreated in scale) for someone to run around in all day.
Colonial America may have been short on medieval cathedrals, but it had plenty of tall trees and mountains you could just as easily run through and over. 
One of the things that’s helped the latter games stand out from the original is the cast of supporting characters. Some of them are fake, sure, but others, like Leonardo Da Vinci, are of course real people, and weaving them into the story has worked wonders.

Imagine, then, the possibilities present in the War of Independence, which has no shortage of both important and fascinating characters. There’s George Washington, of course, interesting not only for his importance, but also for the fact he fought for both sides in his long military career. There’s Benjamin Franklin. Paul Revere. And don’t forget Benedict Arnold as a possible Templar villain, who like Washington fought for both sides (only he did it in the same war).
(Read all at kotaku.com)

Why a Colonial Assassin’s Creed Makes Complete Sense (and Sounds Awesome)

Ubisoft’s Assassin’s Creed games may play loose with the facts, but in the more tangible history of a time period, they excel. What I mean by that is the politics, the attitudes, the society, even the fashion. It’ll be interesting seeing them apply the same focus to such a revered time in American history, and hopefully show that it wasn’t all as heroic as most movies and popular accounts would have you believe.

The choice of a Native American protagonist, as it appears has been made, would only aid this. Rather than having you play as a colonial, or a loyalist, being one of the indigenous population gives them the opportunity to propel the story from outside the partisan restrictions of the reds vs the blues.

People are already complaining that Colonial America lacked the large urban sprawls present in previous games. To that I say…those cities weren’t exactly to scale. You can’t run across Constantinople in a day. I also say, Colonial America had plenty of large urban centres. New York at the time was home to just under 50,000 people, while there were around 25,000 living in Philadelphia. Not exactly Rome, I grant you that, but big enough (if recreated in scale) for someone to run around in all day.

Colonial America may have been short on medieval cathedrals, but it had plenty of tall trees and mountains you could just as easily run through and over. 

One of the things that’s helped the latter games stand out from the original is the cast of supporting characters. Some of them are fake, sure, but others, like Leonardo Da Vinci, are of course real people, and weaving them into the story has worked wonders.

Imagine, then, the possibilities present in the War of Independence, which has no shortage of both important and fascinating characters. There’s George Washington, of course, interesting not only for his importance, but also for the fact he fought for both sides in his long military career. There’s Benjamin Franklin. Paul Revere. And don’t forget Benedict Arnold as a possible Templar villain, who like Washington fought for both sides (only he did it in the same war).

(Read all at kotaku.com)



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Is This the Star of Assassin’s Creed III?
"If this is legitimate, and remember, this is completely unconfirmed, it appears that the chatter placing the third game in the series in the American Revolution is spot-on. In the background is the original Continental flag, the Assassin is wearing an 18th-century military jacket and from his weaponry, jewellery and resemblance to actor Wes Studi he appears to be Native American. Or, since you’d expect he’s still part of hero Desmond’s bloodline, half-Native American."

Is This the Star of Assassin’s Creed III?

"If this is legitimate, and remember, this is completely unconfirmed, it appears that the chatter placing the third game in the series in the American Revolution is spot-on. In the background is the original Continental flag, the Assassin is wearing an 18th-century military jacket and from his weaponry, jewellery and resemblance to actor Wes Studi he appears to be Native American. Or, since you’d expect he’s still part of hero Desmond’s bloodline, half-Native American."



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