Tag: Science

Eunice aphroditois aka the Bobbit Worm
"This unsettling creature is called Eunice aphroditois, or colloquially the Bobbit worm. These critters can grow up to three meters long and have pincers capable of slicing its (sometimes larger) prey right in half. Also? It injects a toxin into its prey to make it easier to digest. Yum.
The worm keeps itself buried in the sand or gravel at the bottom of the sea, only allowing its five tiny antennae to stick up out of the silt. If something swims or crawls along that disturbs one of the antennae, the worm springs up out of the ground and grabs whatever passerby happened to be unlucky that day. They’re found throughout the warmer parts of the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans.”
Eunice aphroditois aka the Bobbit Worm
"This unsettling creature is called Eunice aphroditois, or colloquially the Bobbit worm. These critters can grow up to three meters long and have pincers capable of slicing its (sometimes larger) prey right in half. Also? It injects a toxin into its prey to make it easier to digest. Yum.
The worm keeps itself buried in the sand or gravel at the bottom of the sea, only allowing its five tiny antennae to stick up out of the silt. If something swims or crawls along that disturbs one of the antennae, the worm springs up out of the ground and grabs whatever passerby happened to be unlucky that day. They’re found throughout the warmer parts of the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans.”
Eunice aphroditois aka the Bobbit Worm
"This unsettling creature is called Eunice aphroditois, or colloquially the Bobbit worm. These critters can grow up to three meters long and have pincers capable of slicing its (sometimes larger) prey right in half. Also? It injects a toxin into its prey to make it easier to digest. Yum.
The worm keeps itself buried in the sand or gravel at the bottom of the sea, only allowing its five tiny antennae to stick up out of the silt. If something swims or crawls along that disturbs one of the antennae, the worm springs up out of the ground and grabs whatever passerby happened to be unlucky that day. They’re found throughout the warmer parts of the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans.”

Eunice aphroditois aka the Bobbit Worm

"This unsettling creature is called Eunice aphroditois, or colloquially the Bobbit worm. These critters can grow up to three meters long and have pincers capable of slicing its (sometimes larger) prey right in half. Also? It injects a toxin into its prey to make it easier to digest. Yum.

The worm keeps itself buried in the sand or gravel at the bottom of the sea, only allowing its five tiny antennae to stick up out of the silt. If something swims or crawls along that disturbs one of the antennae, the worm springs up out of the ground and grabs whatever passerby happened to be unlucky that day. They’re found throughout the warmer parts of the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic Oceans.”

Social Octopus Species Shatters Beliefs About Ocean Dwellers
"Panamanian biologist Aradio Rodaniche first reported the Pacific striped octopus in 1991 off the coast of Nicaragua, noting its strange behavior—living in groups of possibly up to 40, laying multiple egg clutches, and mating face-to-face and sucker-to-sucker. Most other octopus species, for instance, come together only to mate.”
“Next thing you know, they’re making spears, forming hunting parties, warring with one another. And then they develop city-states, philosophy, diplomacy, and politics, and all the horrible appurtenances thereof: assassins, lobbyists, and televangelists. Then they take over”. - PZ Myers
Social Octopus Species Shatters Beliefs About Ocean Dwellers
"Panamanian biologist Aradio Rodaniche first reported the Pacific striped octopus in 1991 off the coast of Nicaragua, noting its strange behavior—living in groups of possibly up to 40, laying multiple egg clutches, and mating face-to-face and sucker-to-sucker. Most other octopus species, for instance, come together only to mate.”
“Next thing you know, they’re making spears, forming hunting parties, warring with one another. And then they develop city-states, philosophy, diplomacy, and politics, and all the horrible appurtenances thereof: assassins, lobbyists, and televangelists. Then they take over”. - PZ Myers

Social Octopus Species Shatters Beliefs About Ocean Dwellers

"Panamanian biologist Aradio Rodaniche first reported the Pacific striped octopus in 1991 off the coast of Nicaragua, noting its strange behavior—living in groups of possibly up to 40, laying multiple egg clutches, and mating face-to-face and sucker-to-sucker. Most other octopus species, for instance, come together only to mate.”


Next thing you know, they’re making spears, forming hunting parties, warring with one anotherAnd then they develop city-states, philosophy, diplomacy, and politics, and all the horrible appurtenances thereof: assassins, lobbyists, and televangelists. Then they take over. - PZ Myers

You Should Know: Dr. Marie Daly
"Dr. Daly was the very first African-American (or Black) woman to earn a Ph.D. in Chemistry in the United States. 
Inspired by books of science adventure that she read while visiting her grand parents, young Marie Daly dreamed of becoming a scientist early in life. Having the support of her family, including her father who attended Cornell University and majored in Chemistry, she attended an all-girls secondary school in Queens, NY where she grew up. 

She went on to college and earned a BS in chemistry from Queens College. She worked for a while as laboratory assistant at her alma mater and earned her MS in Chemistry from New York University during this period.
Dr. Daly’s most significant work is examining the biochemistry of cholesterol and heart health. Her groundbreaking work with Dr. Quentin B. Deming at Columbia University (later the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York), disclosed the relationship between high cholesterol and clogged arteries…”
Read the whole post at The Urban Scientist

You Should Know: Dr. Marie Daly

"Dr. Daly was the very first African-American (or Black) woman to earn a Ph.D. in Chemistry in the United States.

Inspired by books of science adventure that she read while visiting her grand parents, young Marie Daly dreamed of becoming a scientist early in life. Having the support of her family, including her father who attended Cornell University and majored in Chemistry, she attended an all-girls secondary school in Queens, NY where she grew up. 

image

She went on to college and earned a BS in chemistry from Queens College. She worked for a while as laboratory assistant at her alma mater and earned her MS in Chemistry from New York University during this period.

Dr. Daly’s most significant work is examining the biochemistry of cholesterol and heart health. Her groundbreaking work with Dr. Quentin B. Deming at Columbia University (later the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University in New York), disclosed the relationship between high cholesterol and clogged arteries…”

Read the whole post at The Urban Scientist

Falsifiability or refutability of a statement, hypothesis, or theory is an inherent possibility to prove it to be false. A statement is called falsifiable if it is possible to conceive an observation or an argument which proves the statement in question to be false. In this sense, falsify is synonymous with nullify, meaning not “to commit fraud” but “show to be false”.

For a statement to be questioned using observation, it needs to be at least theoretically possible that it can come in conflict with observation. A key observation of falsificiationism is thus that a criterion of demarcation is needed to distinguish those statements that can come in conflict with observation and those that cannot (Chorlton, 2012). Popper chose falsifiability as the name of this criterion.”

The point of falsifiability is that it gives us an objective standard by which to measure the truth value of a concept.

We don’t need to rely on your subjective assessment that Martians are unlikely, which is just as well because many people will tell you that it is unlikely that little green men haven’t visisted Earth. Whether these things are likely or unlikely depend entirely on your starting assumptions.

The point of falsification is that it prevents us from misleading ourselves, albeit unintentionally or subconsciously.