Tag: science

Falsifiability or refutability of a statement, hypothesis, or theory is an inherent possibility to prove it to be false. A statement is called falsifiable if it is possible to conceive an observation or an argument which proves the statement in question to be false. In this sense, falsify is synonymous with nullify, meaning not “to commit fraud” but “show to be false”.

For a statement to be questioned using observation, it needs to be at least theoretically possible that it can come in conflict with observation. A key observation of falsificiationism is thus that a criterion of demarcation is needed to distinguish those statements that can come in conflict with observation and those that cannot (Chorlton, 2012). Popper chose falsifiability as the name of this criterion.”

The point of falsifiability is that it gives us an objective standard by which to measure the truth value of a concept.

We don’t need to rely on your subjective assessment that Martians are unlikely, which is just as well because many people will tell you that it is unlikely that little green men haven’t visisted Earth. Whether these things are likely or unlikely depend entirely on your starting assumptions.

The point of falsification is that it prevents us from misleading ourselves, albeit unintentionally or subconsciously. 

Local gravity model of the south pole of the Moon from GRAIL extended mission data
"The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission was designed to map the structure of the lunar interior through high-precision global gravity mapping . 
The mission was composed of two spacecraft with Ka-band intersatellite tracking as the single science instrument, complemented by tracking from Earth using the Deep Space Network (DSN).”
Local gravity model of the south pole of the Moon from GRAIL extended mission data
"The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission was designed to map the structure of the lunar interior through high-precision global gravity mapping . 
The mission was composed of two spacecraft with Ka-band intersatellite tracking as the single science instrument, complemented by tracking from Earth using the Deep Space Network (DSN).”
Local gravity model of the south pole of the Moon from GRAIL extended mission data
"The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission was designed to map the structure of the lunar interior through high-precision global gravity mapping . 
The mission was composed of two spacecraft with Ka-band intersatellite tracking as the single science instrument, complemented by tracking from Earth using the Deep Space Network (DSN).”

Local gravity model of the south pole of the Moon from GRAIL extended mission data

"The Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission was designed to map the structure of the lunar interior through high-precision global gravity mapping .

The mission was composed of two spacecraft with Ka-band intersatellite tracking as the single science instrument, complemented by tracking from Earth using the Deep Space Network (DSN).”

A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science (via Compound Interest)
“The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. 
Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realizing when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do. 
Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research”
Poster available at redbubble
A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science (via Compound Interest)
“The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. 
Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realizing when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do. 
Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research”
Poster available at redbubble
A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science (via Compound Interest)
“The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. 
Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realizing when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do. 
Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research”
Poster available at redbubble
A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science (via Compound Interest)
“The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. 
Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realizing when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do. 
Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research”
Poster available at redbubble
A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science (via Compound Interest)
“The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. 
Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realizing when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do. 
Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research”
Poster available at redbubble
A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science (via Compound Interest)
“The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. 
Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realizing when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do. 
Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research”
Poster available at redbubble
A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science (via Compound Interest)
“The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on. 
Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realizing when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do. 
Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research”
Poster available at redbubble

A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science (via Compound Interest)

The vast majority of people will get their science news from online news site articles, and rarely delve into the research that the article is based on.

Personally, I think it’s therefore important that people are capable of spotting bad scientific methods, or realizing when articles are being economical with the conclusions drawn from research, and that’s what this graphic aims to do.

Note that this is not a comprehensive overview, nor is it implied that the presence of one of the points noted automatically means that the research should be disregarded. This is merely intended to provide a rough guide to things to be alert to when either reading science articles or evaluating research”

Poster available at redbubble

Making Sense of Chemical Stories (via Sense about Science)
"In lifestyle commentary, chemicals are presented as something that can be avoided, or eliminated using special socks, soaps or diets, and that cause only harm to health and damage to the environment. The chemical realities of the world, by contrast, are that everything is made of chemicals, that synthetic chemicals are often much safer for human health than so-called ‘natural’ ones, and that unfounded anxiety about chemicals is encouraging people to buy into ideas and ‘remedies’ that make little scientific or medical sense. 
Anxiety about chemicals is a big part of the discussion about lifestyle and modern living. Lifestyle commentary – health, food, family, and environment – has grown enormously in the past ten years, with increased TV coverage, the expanding internet, and publications by retailers and producers swelling the ranks of the magazine markets. In the daily papers too, lifestyle columns, supplements and advice fight news content for space.
With this rise in lifestyle commentary, misconceptions about what chemicals are and what they do have increased and spread. So much so, that the facts about chemicals seem surprising and counter-intuitive. Do people know that nothing can be ‘chemical free’? How many know that ‘E-numbers’ simply denote approval for food use and include some essential vitamins? Did you know that your body functions in exactly the same way whether you follow a ‘detox’ regime or just a normal diet? Or that the idea of the ‘cocktail effect’ in relation to alcohol is an urban myth? When it comes to chemicals, there are so many misconceptions that people are often scared and anxious when they needn’t be, and complacent when they shouldn’t be. “
This guide flags up the more serious misconceptions that exist around chemicals and suggests straightforward ways for people to evaluate them.
Making Sense of Chemical Stories (via Sense about Science)
"In lifestyle commentary, chemicals are presented as something that can be avoided, or eliminated using special socks, soaps or diets, and that cause only harm to health and damage to the environment. The chemical realities of the world, by contrast, are that everything is made of chemicals, that synthetic chemicals are often much safer for human health than so-called ‘natural’ ones, and that unfounded anxiety about chemicals is encouraging people to buy into ideas and ‘remedies’ that make little scientific or medical sense. 
Anxiety about chemicals is a big part of the discussion about lifestyle and modern living. Lifestyle commentary – health, food, family, and environment – has grown enormously in the past ten years, with increased TV coverage, the expanding internet, and publications by retailers and producers swelling the ranks of the magazine markets. In the daily papers too, lifestyle columns, supplements and advice fight news content for space.
With this rise in lifestyle commentary, misconceptions about what chemicals are and what they do have increased and spread. So much so, that the facts about chemicals seem surprising and counter-intuitive. Do people know that nothing can be ‘chemical free’? How many know that ‘E-numbers’ simply denote approval for food use and include some essential vitamins? Did you know that your body functions in exactly the same way whether you follow a ‘detox’ regime or just a normal diet? Or that the idea of the ‘cocktail effect’ in relation to alcohol is an urban myth? When it comes to chemicals, there are so many misconceptions that people are often scared and anxious when they needn’t be, and complacent when they shouldn’t be. “
This guide flags up the more serious misconceptions that exist around chemicals and suggests straightforward ways for people to evaluate them.
Making Sense of Chemical Stories (via Sense about Science)
"In lifestyle commentary, chemicals are presented as something that can be avoided, or eliminated using special socks, soaps or diets, and that cause only harm to health and damage to the environment. The chemical realities of the world, by contrast, are that everything is made of chemicals, that synthetic chemicals are often much safer for human health than so-called ‘natural’ ones, and that unfounded anxiety about chemicals is encouraging people to buy into ideas and ‘remedies’ that make little scientific or medical sense. 
Anxiety about chemicals is a big part of the discussion about lifestyle and modern living. Lifestyle commentary – health, food, family, and environment – has grown enormously in the past ten years, with increased TV coverage, the expanding internet, and publications by retailers and producers swelling the ranks of the magazine markets. In the daily papers too, lifestyle columns, supplements and advice fight news content for space.
With this rise in lifestyle commentary, misconceptions about what chemicals are and what they do have increased and spread. So much so, that the facts about chemicals seem surprising and counter-intuitive. Do people know that nothing can be ‘chemical free’? How many know that ‘E-numbers’ simply denote approval for food use and include some essential vitamins? Did you know that your body functions in exactly the same way whether you follow a ‘detox’ regime or just a normal diet? Or that the idea of the ‘cocktail effect’ in relation to alcohol is an urban myth? When it comes to chemicals, there are so many misconceptions that people are often scared and anxious when they needn’t be, and complacent when they shouldn’t be. “
This guide flags up the more serious misconceptions that exist around chemicals and suggests straightforward ways for people to evaluate them.

Making Sense of Chemical Stories (via Sense about Science)

"In lifestyle commentary, chemicals are presented as something that can be avoided, or eliminated using special socks, soaps or diets, and that cause only harm to health and damage to the environment. The chemical realities of the world, by contrast, are that everything is made of chemicals, that synthetic chemicals are often much safer for human health than so-called ‘natural’ ones, and that unfounded anxiety about chemicals is encouraging people to buy into ideas and ‘remedies’ that make little scientific or medical sense. 

Anxiety about chemicals is a big part of the discussion about lifestyle and modern living. Lifestyle commentary – health, food, family, and environment – has grown enormously in the past ten years, with increased TV coverage, the expanding internet, and publications by retailers and producers swelling the ranks of the magazine markets. In the daily papers too, lifestyle columns, supplements and advice fight news content for space.

With this rise in lifestyle commentary, misconceptions about what chemicals are and what they do have increased and spread. So much so, that the facts about chemicals seem surprising and counter-intuitive. Do people know that nothing can be ‘chemical free’? How many know that ‘E-numbers’ simply denote approval for food use and include some essential vitamins? Did you know that your body functions in exactly the same way whether you follow a ‘detox’ regime or just a normal diet? Or that the idea of the ‘cocktail effect’ in relation to alcohol is an urban myth? When it comes to chemicals, there are so many misconceptions that people are often scared and anxious when they needn’t be, and complacent when they shouldn’t be. “

This guide flags up the more serious misconceptions that exist around chemicals and suggests straightforward ways for people to evaluate them.